Seriesamlarens tid är över!?

Diskussioner och frågor om förvaringsmöjligheter, skickgradering, prissättning m.m.
Användarvisningsbild
Skakben
Very Fine
Inlägg: 894
Blev medlem: tor 20 okt 2005, 17:23

Seriesamlarens tid är över!?

Inläggav Skakben » ons 15 mar 2006, 16:18

Who's Going to Want Grandma's Gnomes?
By JEFFREY ZASLOW

From The Wall Street Journal Online


In Graytown, Ohio, 51-year-old Doug Martin has amassed a collection of 5,000 pencils, most of them never used. Some date back to the 1800s.

He sometimes wonders what will become of his prized collection when he dies. Will his children stick them in a sharpener and write with them? "It hurts to think about it," he says.

Young people today have little interest in the stamp, coin or knickknack collections of their elders, so an aging America can't help but wonder: What's going to happen to all those boxes in the basement?

Well, here's an idea for Mr. Martin: "His children can glue his pencils together and make a coffin for him," says Harry Rinker, sharply.

A collectibles researcher in Vera Cruz, Pa., Mr. Rinker, 64, himself collects everything from jigsaw puzzles to antique toilet paper. But he thinks sentimental "accumulators" need a reality check. "Old-timers thought the next generation would love their stuff the way they did," he says. "Well guess what -- it's not happening." He advises: Enjoy your collections, die with them, and have no expectations about anything after that.

Collecting things, once a big part of childhood, is now pretty much passé with kids. Preoccupied with MP3 players and computer games, they are rarely found sitting at the kitchen table putting postage stamps into collectors' books or slipping old coins into plastic sleeves. These days, baseball cards and comic books are collected by adults. Of the estimated 37 million Americans who identified themselves as collectors in 2000, just 11% were under the age of 36, according to a study by marketing consultant Unity Marketing Inc. Most were over 50.

Some collectors say they wouldn't mind if their heirs just sold everything on eBay. The Internet keeps alive a market for many objects by making it easy for far-flung collectors to find one another. But people do fear that collections lovingly assembled will be mishandled or trashed by their offspring. That's why collectors groups are now organizing emergency efforts to keep things out of the wrong hands.

The International Sewing Machine Collectors' Society, based in London, gets in touch with families when it hears of a member's death, so the machines can end up with someone who will treasure them. They're often too late. One member recently died and his family sold his old sewing machines to a junk dealer for $200. The machines, some dating to the 1860s, were worth about $65,000, according to Graham Forsdyke, secretary for the 800-member society. He adds: "I don't know of a single collection that's been passed down after a death."

Young people today amass hundreds of songs on their iPods and, decades from now, may very well be collecting "vintage" cellphones or other electronic devices, says Linda Kruger, editor of Collectors News, based in Grundy Center, Iowa. Or it may just be so much junk. There's no way to predict the future value of such things, she adds.

In the meantime, most young people don't connect with their elders' collections. In Goodyear, Ariz., Zita Wessa, 72, says her grandchildren walk past her display cases of gnome figurines "and show no interest at all." Her 45-year-old son, Scott, says he'd be happy to inherit one of the giant cabinets she stores them in, but the gnomes "don't do much for me. If she begged me to take them, I would, because I love my mother. But I don't know what I'd do with them." (His mom says she paid $5,600 over the years for her 160 gnomes, but their current value is uncertain.)

William Adrian, 72, of Plainfield, Ill., collects miniature guns. He says his three children "wouldn't give you a twenty-dollar bill for any of it."

"Collecting is about memory, and young people today have a different memory base," explains Mr. Rinker, who is well known in antiquing circles for his books and personal appearances. He lives in a 14,000-square-foot former elementary school in Vera Cruz, Pa. He uses the classrooms as storage spaces for his 250 different collections. He says he doesn't care what becomes of it all once he's gone, and if his children opt to use his rolls of century-old toilet paper, "that might be the finest honor they can give me."

Mr. Martin, the pencil collector, is unlikely to have his collection stay in the family after he dies. His daughter, Elizabeth Jefferson, 24, says if she inherits the pencils -- which her dad values at $4,500 -- she'd donate them to other collectors or to a museum.

If new generations of collectors don't materialize, the value of items will plummet. That's why marble clubs, to generate enthusiasm, send free marbles to schools. The U.S. Mint has a Web site with cartoons and computer games to entertain kids about the thrills of coin-collecting. Indeed, children have shown considerable interest in the state quarters program.

In West Chester, Pa., Judy Knauer, founder of the 700-member National Toothpick Holder Collectors' Society, gives away toothpick holders to young people. She tells them, "Here's your start." But few get hooked.

Some collecting groups have created unstated policies. The 650-member National Milk Glass Collectors Society -- a group devoted to opaque glass -- holds an annual auction. When the rare young person shows up to bid on an item, older collectors lower their hands. "We back off and let the young person buy it. We want them to add to their collections," says Bart Gardner, the group's past president.

In Palo Alto, Calif., Tom Wyman, 78, has about 900 antique slide rules. Mr. Wyman belongs to the 430-member Oughtred Society, named for William Oughtred, who in the 1620s invented an early form of the slide rule. The group hosts lectures to entice youngsters to embrace slide-rule collecting. But Mr. Wyman says such "missionary work" is a hard sell. "It's quite a challenge to give a talk that keeps everybody awake -- both the 80-year-old collectors and the 12-year-olds in the audience."

Mr. Wyman's son, Tom, 41, who doesn't know how to use a slide rule, admires his dad's devotion to preserving the instrument. Still, he appreciates that his father has promised to eventually dispose of the collection. "He has told me, 'I won't saddle you with this,' " says the younger Mr. Wyman. Some of the slide rules are worth just pennies, while others could sell for $2,000.

George Beilke, 61, of Tulsa, Okla., has amassed 35,000 used instant-lottery tickets. His daughter, Sarah, 23, says that when she tells friends about the collection, "they look at me like I'm crazy. It's guilt by association." During her childhood, her dad tried to get her involved. He gave her tickets and assumed she was diligently putting them between the sheet protectors he provided. But she just hid them in her room.

Ms. Beilke is set to inherit the collection and says she'll donate it to the 200-member Global Lottery Collector's Society. She may hold on to a handful of tickets as keepsakes. "It would keep the bond between us," says her dad. "I just hope she puts them in the sheet protectors."

Some collectors now accept that younger people don't want their stuff. Philadelphia Daily News columnist Stu Bykofsky, 64, has collected the last editions of 79 daily newspapers that closed down since 1963. His adult children don't want the old newspapers, which fill a closet. "The only kind of paper my family wants is greenbacks and stock certificates," he says.

He hasn't been able to find a university to take his collection, either. And now he's under the gun to get rid of it. He is about to marry his third wife, who is 27 years old, and in the prenuptial agreement, there's a clause that he must dispose of the collection by Dec. 31. She wants to store her shoes in that closet.

"At least I can wear my shoes," says his fiancée, Jennifer Graham. "He never reads those papers, and besides, he likes how I look in my shoes."

Användarvisningsbild
Looding
Mint
Inlägg: 5270
Blev medlem: lör 08 jan 2005, 12:34
Kontakt:

Inläggav Looding » ons 15 mar 2006, 16:39

intressant läsning men också depprimerande...
Har du information som saknas eller behövs ändras i https://www.seriekatalogen.se så kontakta mig eller skicka ett mail till seriekatalogen.se[at]gmail.com

Användarvisningsbild
spidercrazy
Fine
Inlägg: 335
Blev medlem: mån 03 okt 2005, 16:18
Ort: Sverige

Inläggav spidercrazy » ons 15 mar 2006, 20:16

Jo men serier kommer väl alltid vara intressant att läsa, och därmed samla? Förvisso kommer kanske framtida generationer att inrikta samlandet mer mot Nemi och Dragonball, men klassiker som Carl Barks Kalle Anka är ju tidlösa och kommer att läsas och samlas även om 200 år (och vid det laget lär man väl få betala några miljoner för ett ex av Kalle 1-48).
Å nu pojk ska du få lära dig hur man pelkar en fnög!

Användarvisningsbild
impeesa
Very Fine
Inlägg: 1163
Blev medlem: sön 08 jan 2006, 17:00
Ort: Wallis and Futuna Islands

Inläggav impeesa » ons 15 mar 2006, 22:56

Men hur står det till med serietidningsläsandet generellt? Om färre läser nu kommer det att finnas färre människor som finner intresse att samla eller läsa. Däremot tror jag att seriesamlaren "ligger bättre till" än tex frimärkssamlaren eftersom frimärken inte går att läsa och skratta till. Man gör som sagt inte så mycket med en bok frimärken. En serietidning går ju (oftast) att läsa och njuta av.
Svenska Star Wars/Stjärnornas Krig i toppskick sökes.

Användarvisningsbild
lennon
Very Fine
Inlägg: 1527
Blev medlem: fre 28 okt 2005, 14:21
Ort: Sverige
Kontakt:

Inläggav lennon » tor 16 mar 2006, 09:39

citat:
Ursprungligen postat av impeesa

Men hur står det till med serietidningsläsandet generellt? Om färre läser nu kommer det att finnas färre människor som finner intresse att samla eller läsa. Däremot tror jag att seriesamlaren "ligger bättre till" än tex frimärkssamlaren eftersom frimärken inte går att läsa och skratta till. Man gör som sagt inte så mycket med en bok frimärken. En serietidning går ju (oftast) att läsa och njuta av.


Inte för att jag är så insatt, men man kan ju tänka sig vad e-mailen har gjort för frimärkssamlande. Nyrekryteringen av frimärkssamlare måste vara marginell.
www.albumforlaget.se

Användarvisningsbild
Thomas E
Avstängd
Inlägg: 1438
Blev medlem: lör 01 okt 2005, 00:22

Inläggav Thomas E » tor 16 mar 2006, 09:54

Man kan ju tro att artikeln behandlar samlande generellt. Men de exempel som nämns är ju mer "hamstrare" av udda varor med visserligen stort kulturhistoriskt värde, men som aldrig uppskattats ekonomiskt. Varor som med fördel kan ges bort till något museum när man tröttnar.

Så fina saker som serietidningar kommer alltid att ha både kulturhistoriskt värde OCH ekonomiskt värde = hög status = många intresserade. Alltid = under min livstid = det enda som räknas.

Användarvisningsbild
Ingemar
Near Mint
Inlägg: 2434
Blev medlem: lör 12 mar 2005, 18:34

Inläggav Ingemar » tor 16 mar 2006, 11:00

Äsch, det där är faktiskt inget att bry sig om. Visst, tiderna förändras, och givetvis kommer mina barn att slänga det mesta av min bråte på tippen när jag kilar vidare, men det är inte mitt bekymmer. De sparar det de bryr sig om.

Och vet ni vad? Mina barn ÄLSKAR mina gamla serier! Så länge jag är klok nog att läsa serierna för mina barn kommer serierna att vara en del av deras minnen såväl som mina.

Användarvisningsbild
JörgenS
Fine
Inlägg: 251
Blev medlem: mån 01 aug 2005, 17:48
Ort: Sverige
Kontakt:

Inläggav JörgenS » tor 16 mar 2006, 11:31

Problemet är att vi lever i ett slit och släng samhälle där vi inte ska varken se framåt eller bakåt eller behålla det vi tycker är bra utan bara konsumera nytt och kasta det sen. Men jag tror att jag håller med Ingemar här. Gillar man nåt tillräckligt mycket så samlar man, vad eftervärlden gör sen med det är inte ens eget problem. Det är ju som låten säger:
"Du kan inget ta med dig, dit du går".
Men sen är det ju så att de människor i artikeln som talar om sina barns bristande intresse vet ju inte hur det ser ut i framtiden. Barnen kanske blir intresserade av att samla ju äldre de blir. Man blir oftast mer intresserad av det förflutna ju äldre man blir.
Transform and roll out!

/JS10

Användarvisningsbild
Ingemar
Near Mint
Inlägg: 2434
Blev medlem: lör 12 mar 2005, 18:34

Inläggav Ingemar » lör 18 mar 2006, 10:44

Framtiden varar fram till nästa år. Allt bortom det är så okänt att det är meningslöst att bekymra sig om. Läs serier, samla frimärken, knyppla eller vad ni vill. Här och nu.

Användarvisningsbild
Olof
Fine
Inlägg: 391
Blev medlem: tor 06 jan 2005, 08:02
Ort: Sweden

Inläggav Olof » lör 18 mar 2006, 16:52

citat:
Ursprungligen postat av Ingemar

Äsch, det där är faktiskt inget att bry sig om. Visst, tiderna förändras, och givetvis kommer mina barn att slänga det mesta av min bråte på tippen när jag kilar vidare, men det är inte mitt bekymmer. De sparar det de bryr sig om.


Det håller jag med om. Det viktigaste med min seriesamling är att jag själv har nytta och glädje av den. Om mina barn efter mitt frånfälle släpar ut albumen på gården och sätter eld på hela rasket är inte mina bekymmer eftersom jag som död inte längre kan njuta av samlingen.

Man ska nog inte bekymra sig så mycket om framtiden. "Samlargenen" ligger i människans uppbyggnad, många av oss är skapta med en framträdande vilja att samla på oss olika saker. Vad dessa saker är styrs mer av det omgivande samhället än vad som bör bevaras kulturhistoriskt. Förr samlade man frimärken och mynt, idag samlar man serier och saker från barndomen. Imorgon samlar man något annat. Det viktiga för en samlare är att det han samlar på ska skapa en för honom viktig känsla, kanske ett minne från barndomen eller något annat. Därför är samlandet självt självuppfyllande. Sen vad man samlar på är oväsentligt bara det lockar fram den där känslan man eftersöker.

Användarvisningsbild
Magnus
Near Mint
Inlägg: 3801
Blev medlem: tor 09 jun 2005, 19:26
Ort: Sverige

Inläggav Magnus » tor 01 jun 2006, 07:04

Det är ett problem att trådar används så sällan. Man glömmer att dom existerar.
Simma lugnt!

Användarvisningsbild
rkaj
Near Mint
Inlägg: 3546
Blev medlem: ons 05 jan 2005, 20:18
Ort: Stockholm
Kontakt:

Inläggav rkaj » tor 01 jun 2006, 23:15

citat:
Ursprungligen postat av Magnus

Samlande i vuxen ålder är mycket knuten till vad man konsumerade som barn. Idag använder ingen frimärken, man skickar email istället, och få läser serier.



Det har du nog rätt i ... Då tror ju jag att det som kommer att vara populärt att samla på om 20-40 år är dataspel, som ju fortfarande går kraftigt frammåt ... Särskillt de titlar som är långkörare och finns på flera plattformar kan bli värdefulla. Så mitt tips till de som samlar för ekonomisk vinning är tidiga utgåvor av Zelda (till NES) och Final Fantasy (till play station etc).

Fast själv fortsätter jag med serietidningarna! [8D]

Användarvisningsbild
AndersL_
Very Fine
Inlägg: 1100
Blev medlem: sön 04 dec 2005, 22:30
Ort: Christmas Island
Kontakt:

Inläggav AndersL_ » tor 01 jun 2006, 23:26

citat:
Ursprungligen postat av rkaj

citat:
Ursprungligen postat av Magnus

Samlande i vuxen ålder är mycket knuten till vad man konsumerade som barn. Idag använder ingen frimärken, man skickar email istället, och få läser serier.



Det har du nog rätt i ... Då tror ju jag att det som kommer att vara populärt att samla på om 20-40 år är dataspel, som ju fortfarande går kraftigt frammåt ... Särskillt de titlar som är långkörare och finns på flera plattformar kan bli värdefulla. Så mitt tips till de som samlar för ekonomisk vinning är tidiga utgåvor av Zelda (till NES) och Final Fantasy (till play station etc).

Fast själv fortsätter jag med serietidningarna! [8D]



Jag tror inte att spel som dessa kan komma att bli mycket mer eftertraktade än de är nu. De sålde bra redan från början, och det kommer hela tiden ut nyutgåvor av dem till andra konsoler. Final Fantasy VII finns t.ex. till PC, så det kommer aldrig att kunna ta slut eftersom det kan kopieras.
I så fall är det antagligen annorlunda med eftertraktade spel som inte har getts ut på nytt och som var svåra redan efter 1-2 år, t.ex. Chrono Trigger, Terranigma och Super Mario RPG. De har bra förutsättningar för att bli dyrare och dyrare. [:)]
- - AndersL - -

Användarvisningsbild
Skakben
Very Fine
Inlägg: 894
Blev medlem: tor 20 okt 2005, 17:23

Inläggav Skakben » fre 02 jun 2006, 05:03

Tror ni inte inställningen till materiella saker kommer att förändras i framtiden?
Slit och släng mentalitet, alla sorters produkter/information kommer att vara superbilligt och väldigt lättillgängligt överallt i världen. Att samla på sig prylar anses bara sakta ner en då världen är öppen och man kan ta sig från Minsk till Rio till Överkalix i bara ett vips! Ena veckan bor man i ett underjordssamhälle i någon kall världsdel och nästa vecka i ett 300 våningshus i södra mexiko; då går det inte att släpa med sig 50 hyllmeter med gulnade serietidningar från 1970-talet som faller i smulor om man plockar ut dem ur mylaren.
Eller var det 10-20 år vi pratade om? Jag tänkte kanske på 100 år[B)]

Användarvisningsbild
Magnus
Near Mint
Inlägg: 3801
Blev medlem: tor 09 jun 2005, 19:26
Ort: Sverige

Inläggav Magnus » fre 02 jun 2006, 05:17

Ingen större idé att bekymra sej för mycket om framtiden. Samla på om ni tycker det är roligt, lägg inte större summor än privatekonomin tål och gå inte runt hemma och bara titta på mint-tidningarna, LÄS dom också!
Simma lugnt!

Användarvisningsbild
Ingemar
Near Mint
Inlägg: 2434
Blev medlem: lör 12 mar 2005, 18:34

Inläggav Ingemar » fre 02 jun 2006, 07:43

Nej, som sagt, bekymra er inte om framtiden. Om framtidens svenskar pratar annorlunda, tycker annorlunda, ser annorlunda på saker, det är deras sak. Vi kan leva på våra sätt så länge vi finns.

Som jag sagt förut, mina barn inte bara läser serier, de tycker mina album är toppen. Jag läste "Vårdagjämningens hjältar" som nattläsning för min son härom dagen, och han tycker det var en riktig höjdare, och just nu kommer han här och citerar Valhall. Han har smak, grabben! (Fast han gillar även Transformers och diverse superhjältar mm - men det bjuder vi på.)


Återgå till "Om seriesamlandets ädla konst"

Vilka är online

Användare som besöker denna kategori: 6 och 0 gäster